Angels in comfortable shoes

I have spoken many times about the incredible medical team that looks after me. It consists of so many amazing people, but I wanted to write specifically about one group of people who are so integral in the supporting patients through their cancer journey: the nurses. As a patient, you end up meeting so many nurses: at chemotherapy, during inpatient admissions or at outpatient clinic appointments. Every nurse that I have met athe Royal Marsden has left a mark on me – and I don’t just mean at the site of my cannula! So to try and explain more, I’ve written about my experience of nurses from when I was diagnosed, throughout my chemotherapy and surgery and as I continue on with my treatment. 

 Diagnosis

On the 3rd June 2016, I entered the Royal Marsden for the first time clutching the hand of an A&E nurse who had decided to travel with me from Barnet hospital. She had made the journey with me because she saw how distressed and overwhelmed I was. When we arrived, I was met by an extremely caring nurse who did everything she could to make me feel calm whist I waited for the consultant to arrive. I always remembered her and how much she tried to put me at ease. Months later, on the 7th November, I was having my final chemotherapy session which had overrun as I needed a blood transfusion. The chemo ward was closing and so I was moved to a general inpatient ward to finish treatment. Unbeknown to her or me, she was my nurse that evening! It was such an emotional reunionI was able to update her on how my treatment had gone and tell her that I had succeeded in kicking ‘Cyril’ out of the boxing ring! This nurse put my first Marsden cannula in, and it seemed quite fitting that she took the cannula out from my final chemo session (shown in the photo below).

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 Chemotherapy and day treatment unit nurses 

I had eighteen sessions of chemotherapy and it did not take long for me to get to know all the amazing nurses on the chemo ward. They are always smiling, eager to know all about the things that you have been doing between sessions and always there to comfort you. They make you feel like a person and not just a cancer patient. The care they give you is nothing short of incredible.  For me, I always remember the small things: how they would take time to prep my hair for the scalp cooling, explain complicated medical things in a way that makes sense (even after I had asked them the same question numerous times!), make sure you are comfortable, warm enough, cool enough, hydrated and not hungry. They’re also always ready to have a laugh with you. I can think back to so many funny times when I had my pre-meds which would make me feel slightly drunk or make me wriggle in the chair because one of the pre-meds causes an itchy bottom! I still have my treatment every three weeks on the ward so still get to be looked after by this wonderful nursing team.

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 Inpatient ward nurses 

I also met many different nurses when I was admitted to hospital for my surgery.  I clearly remember the nurse who looked after me in the surgical admissions unit. He was amazing at keeping me calm when I was possibly the least calm I’ve ever felt. I obviously never met the nurses who assisted my operation, but I know from reading and talking with my consultant what an important role they have in theatre. Throughout my stay in Critical Care I was cared for so well. I remember waking up on the unit after surgery and knowing that I would be ok when I heard my nurse’s calming voice. Every nurse I met in this unit made me feel incredibly safe in the initial post operation period, which can seem really frightening at times. Again it was the small things: helping me to keep clean, doing my hair (without a hairband…one nurse managed to fashion a hairband out of the top of a surgical glove!), making sure I was comfortable with pillows, helping me to slowly start drinking fluids and just holding my hand and encouraging me when I was in pain.

 When I moved of the unit on the general ward the nurses were also brilliant. Each stage of your recovery requires something different and they seem to know just what you need to get you through itThe ward nurses were reassuring but also very encouraging; if they thought I could do something on my own they would help me to do it rather than do it for me. They helped me have a shower for the first time and were so encouraging with my rehab. After surgery one of the goals on the ward is to be able to get your catheter removed as soon as possible and use the bathroom instead. This obviously involves walking, which after surgery, is much harder than you can ever imagine. My nurse would keep encouraging me to walk just that little bit more each day because she knew I could get to the point of having it removed…which felt like such a big milestone. I also was so grateful to be able to talk to the nurses – they have so much experience that I always felt like they understood what it was like when I feeling low or having a bad day.

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Clinical Nurse Specialist 

 At the Royal Marsden you are also assigned a clinical specialist nurse who is there to support you throughout your journey. I met my nurse on my first night in the Royal Marsden back in June, and I know that she is always there when I need her. After my operation it was so helpful to talk through all of the possible symptoms of menopause with her, some of which I had never even considered before then. After having this conversation, I remember feeling a lot calmer about menopause because I knew what to expect. It’s also reassuring to know that there is someone on the end of a phone or email who you can contact with a question or worry. 

 So there’s a brief look at how the nurses at the Royal Marsden who have been, and continue to be, such an important part of my journey. They hold a very special place in my heart. As a patient, I’ve found that you never forget what the nurses say, what they do and how they make you feel. I would like to take this opportunity to thank, not just nurses that I have come in contact with, but to nurses in general. 

You may have started reading this blog and wondered about the title. When I was reading up on the role of nurses I came across the idea and it just seemed to completely fit with my experience of them. ‘Angel’ is one of the best ways to describe nurses. And the comfortable shoes…well if you’ve got to the end of this you will hopefully understand just how much nurses do in a day – even angels would get sore feet.

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Keep calm and make lists

On Monday 7th November, I was back on the chemo ward to complete cycle six of my chemo. This also marked the end of my chemo! Below is a photo collage that my brother made for me to mark this milestone. The end of chemo doesn’t mean the end of my treatment though; it means I’ve finished one more stage of it. I will be back at the Marsden next week for a new CT scan, and to see the professor in charge of my chemo to get the scan results. I’ll also find out a bit more about my three weekly Avastin maintenance treatment.

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So back to chemo this week. After took two attempts to get my cannula in, everything went smoothly. It was great to have a visit from my consultant and specialist nurse during the day. As we stood together talking at my final chemo session, I had a flashback to 3rd June when we all first met, but in very different circumstances. I had not slept for a day, was in my pyjamas and a hoodie that was far too big for me with a crazy, ‘I’ve not dealt with my hair for two days’ hairdo. I was also filled with anxiety, fear and shock. On Monday, it was a completely different story. I was dressed in clothes that made me feel good, had make up on and had exchanged the crazy hairdo for a cooling cap. More importantly, I felt like a completely different person. This flashback made me emotional because it was another reminder of how far I have come with the support of my incredible medical team, family and friends. We all spoke about what I was going to do to celebrate getting to this point. I have a long list, but the first thing I plan to do is get my nose pierced! After years of saying I want to get it done, but being too scared of the pain, I’ve decided to go for it. Given the amount of cannulas I’ve had this year, and not forgetting the major surgery bit, I’m hopeful that a small piecing will be nothing in comparison!

Back to chemo this week…My magnesium and haemoglobin were low, so that meant another 2 ½ hours of IV magnesium and a 4-hour blood transfusion after my chemotherapy drugs. I ended up being at the Marsden from 8am-9pm… A new record for me! As I was there so late, I had to be transferred to an inpatient ward for the final unit of blood, because the chemotherapy day unit closes at 7pm. Luckily I had plenty of evening company. It was wonderful to have my friend Rosie, my dad, my aunt and my sister with me. I also received beautiful bouquets of flowers from my friends Rosie and Jessica. As I have explained before, flowers make me think of a quote by Henri Matisse: ‘Il y a des fleurs partout qui veut bien les voir.’ This translates as: ‘There are flowers everywhere for those who want to see them.’ Matisse was highlighting the importance of optimism and having a positive outlook on life, which is something I know I need to be doing, despite the uncertainties that I feel I am facing.

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That evening on the ward, it was such a wonderful surprise to see the first nurse I met at the Marsden the day that I was transferred there from A&E back on 3rd June. She put my first Marsden cannula in, and it seemed quite fitting that she took the cannula out from my final chemo session. I hadn’t seen her since that first night, so I got to tell her all about my treatment and the blog.  I’m also so pleased that she now has a Finding Cyril band!

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In last week’s blog I spoke about my fears regarding my future health and how the ongoing support from my medical team, family and friends is helping me to deal with these fears. I also mentioned the need to find ways to cope with some of the difficult feelings and emotions. A few days ago, I tried something else – I decided to write a list called: ‘Normal Things.’ This list (I have shared a snippet of it below) includes lots of things that I haven’t done over the past six months, because I either haven’t felt able, or have been too anxious to do. Some of the things might seem really easy but they have become quite hard for me. My theory is that this list of things will help me to keep busy between my now three-weekly maintenance treatments at the Marsden, and therefore help keep my mind from focusing on what my tumour markers will be doing, and my worries about the future. My idea of the list relates to something that the American writer Dale Harbison Carnegie once said: ‘Inaction breeds doubt and fear. Action breeds confidence and courage. If you want to conquer fear, do not sit home and think about it. Go out and get busy.’ As I have said before, I know that it is a case of trial and error to find the coping mechanisms that will help me deal with the uncertainties that I face, and I might have to adapt and change these mechanisms depending on what I am going through. I’m pleased to say that I’ve already ticked three things off my list this week….I took a tube on my own and went to my Marsden appointment on Wednesday on my own! On Thursday, I went to a shopping centre for the first time since my diagnosis and made some great purchases! I know that there are bound to be days when whatever I try to do to help me cope might feel futile, and that I may feel like I don’t know what my next step is. For now though, I’m just trying to stay focused on reminding myself that when things get tough, I have to get tougher and continue to push forward, however hard it feels.

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As I enter into the next phase of my treatment, I also find myself reflecting on the last six months, and the fact that I have learned, and I continue to learn, that I am a lot stronger than I ever thought I was. There have been many times in my life where I have questioned my ability to do things, or thought that I was not strong enough to deal with certain things that were happening. But ‘Cyril’ has shown me that there seems to be a lot of truth in Bob Marley’s famous words: ‘You never know how strong you are, until being strong is the only choice you have.’

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A tricky week

On Monday 19th September, I was back on the chemo ward for part two of cycle four. I went through all the regular checks, and this week my veins were well behaved for my wonderful nurse! However, my blood caused her a bit of trouble when she tried to do my routine blood tests. But the incredible nurses have lots of tricks up their sleeves to solve problems. Instead of trying to fill up each vial with blood, she attached a syringe to my cannula and took all of the blood she needed. She then put my blood in each vial. Although she got a cannula in on the first go, I will still consider putting the PICC line in the future, if my veins keeping playing up.

When the doctor came to see me, we spoke about how the week had been and how I was feeling. Unfortunately, I got some news that instantly shook me. On Monday 12th September, my CA 125 was taken and it came back at 333 (this is very high). The last time it had been taken was before my operation and it was at 16. This was a confusing result because three days prior to this I had a CT scan, which revealed no sign of cancer, but some fluid on the outer lining of my right lung. She explained to me that they were going to repeat my CA 125 and depending on this result they would possibly do another scan to see what was going on. She told me that later in the day the professor in charge of my chemo would come and see me to explain more. When he came to see me, he explained that they thought the CA 125 reading was high because of a plural effusion that I had developed after my operation. He explained to me that a build up of fluid that is not cancerous could cause a CA 125 reading to increase. He told me that we just had to wait for the new CA 125 reading the next day, and if it had decreased there would be no need for a repeat scan.

If I am being wholeheartedly honest, in a split second the mantra about accepting bumps along this road, that I have tried so hard to follow went out of the window. I was in complete disarray. All I could think of and say were negative things, and no matter what people said to me, I found it very hard to bring myself back to a clear state of mind. However, with the support of the medical team, my family, and my friends Chloe and Rosie, who visited the chemo ward during their lunch break, I managed to calm down and focus on having my chemo. On Tuesday 13th September, I got good news from the chemo ward! My CA 125 had gone down to 192, and the increase in this level was due to the plural effusion as suspected. There is no need to repeat my CT scan and my chemo is going ahead as planned. My CA 125 will be checked each week.

Time to get back to chemo. Once my bloods came back, my cooling cap was prepared and my chemo got underway. I had to stay two hours extra because I was low on magnesium and the doctor wanted to administer intravenous magnesium. I had my usual foot massage, and it was wonderful to spend time with my friends Chloe and Rosie, who as I said gave up their lunch breaks to be with me on the chemo ward. After a slightly longer session, it was time to head off home and put my feet up.

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As I mentioned at the start of this blog, the good news about the CA 125 level came on Tuesday 20th September, so I did find myself getting very anxious until the phone call came. Once I had heard the good news, I could breath a sigh of relief. By way of celebrating this good news, and given that I was feeling well, I decided to go out to a local restaurant with my dad for some lunch. This was a huge thing for me to do because I had never gone out the day after a chemo session, apart from once when I had to go back to hospital for a blood transfusion and a CT scan. Whilst we were out, we met my friend Rosie’s wonderful grandma (see the photo below), who is a super star at selling Finding Cyril bands!

Unfortunately, when we got home I started to get hot and cold and my temperature went up. This meant a visit to A and E because when you are on chemo you have to be checked if your temperature is 38°C or more. I am sure I am speaking for everybody when I say I hate going to A and E, and this just felt even worse after having such a wonderful morning. My dad and my amazing cousin David, who is like my big brother, came with me. My blood tests and X-Ray were normal, but the decision was made to treat it like an infection. Therefore, I was given intravenous paracetamol, intravenous antibiotics, fluids and then sent home with more antibiotics. We ended up being in A and E for seven hours because they would not let me home until my heart rate lowered. I am known to have a high heart rate, but for some reason it seems to go through the roof when I visit A and E! As you can see below I documented the A and E visit with a photo!

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This visit to A and E took me back to the 3rd June. On this day, I made my second visit to A and E where a CT scan revealed a concerning swelling on my right ovary. This memory came back to me because as was lying in the cubicle opposite the one that I was in on the 3rd June. As I was lying down being given fluids, I was looking at the other bed and recalling the anxiety, fear and pain I felt after hearing the CT scan result and waiting for my transfer to the Royal Marsden. Being opposite this bay (see the photo below) spurred me on to enquire about the amazing nurse who looked after me that day, and came with me when I was transferred to the Royal Marsden. It only took asking a few nurses to find her, and on Friday 23rd September I got to talk to her on the phone! There has not been a day when I have not thought about this nurse. She comforted me from the moment the scan result was revealed. She came with me in the cab to the Marsden and held my hand the whole way. I will be forever thankful to her, and she will always have a very special place in my heart because of the care and compassion that she showed me at a very difficult time.

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So this week has been a real challenge for me physically and emotionally. I had the worry about my tumour markers, a visit to A and E, I am a lot weaker from chemo, I am full of mixed emotions and I am still recovering from my operation. This has all contributed to my anxiety levels rising this week (I can sense it because my heart constantly feels like it is popping out of my chest!). To deal with this anxiety I have taken it very easy. I have had two amazing facials by my auntie Roz, and I have had a wonderful reflexology session at Chai Cancer Care. Messages of encouragement from friends and family have also boosted me (as they always do).  Below you can see some of the beautiful photos that my friend Anna sent me from Italy that instantly put a smile on my face, and a photo from cousin’s fiancé Gemma showing me how well she is doing with selling her Finding Cyril bands to help raise funds for the Royal Marsden! These things have helped but I have still found myself panicking when the thermometer goes in my ear because I worry that I will find myself back in A and E. However, the antibiotics seem to be kicking in!

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As I move into next week, I hope that I will have more ups than downs, but I need to keep reminding myself that these ups and downs are normal when fighting ‘Cyril,’ so if a low moment occurs I have to accept it, allow it to happen and then find ways to deal with it, just like I tried to do this week. I have to remember that ‘Difficult roads often lead to beautiful destinations.’

Everybody needs good neighbours…especially when recovering from surgery.

Being at home after surgery has had its ups and downs; both emotionally and physically, but I do believe that being in my own surroundings has pushed me forward in my recovery. The way that I’ve been trying to manage is by taking each day as it comes. I find it helpful to have routine. I’ve been keeping on top of my medication, trying to walk a little more each day, and doing my physiotherapy exercises. I have also started working with a physiotherapist from Chai Cancer Care at home, which has helped me become more confident and motivated with my daily exercises.

Eating has been a gradual improvement and I’m now able to manage more food and bigger portions again. I’ve been able to get back to my usual weird mix for breakfast: kiwis, eggs, bananas and pancakes. Diet is a really important focus for me because I want to be preparing my body for restarting chemotherapy.

I’ve tried to keep things as quiet and relaxed as possible at home – I’ve had lots of relaxation time and with the help of my auntie, two wonderful facials. My skin really needed this after a week in hospital!

 

The texts, emails and phone calls from family and friends have also helped to push me forward in my recovery. The encouragement I get from everyone reminds me that I am strong enough to deal with what I’ve been through, and what I’m still going through. And the support has come from people of all ages. This includes my three year old nephew (see the video below), and two of my young neighbours baking very tasty brownies for me!

I’ve also had some words of encouragement from some celebrities. For those who know me well, you will know that I have been an avid Neighbours and Home and Away fan for as long as I could turn the TV on. I will never miss an episode, especially now that I have quite a bit of time on my hands. I’ve even been known watch episodes on my phone when I can’t get to a TV. So you can imagine my excitement when I received signed cards and messages from some of the Neighbours cast, who had taken the time to read my blog, learn about my experience with cancer and what I am trying to do to raise awareness. It’s made my week and I’m fully intending to take them up on their offer to meet them all once I’m well enough to travel to Australia!

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Emotionally and physically I’ve been up and down, and I’d be lying if I said that ‘Cyril’ hasn’t tested me since being home; probably more than it ever has on this journey. I have had my moments where I’ve cried, sometimes not even knowing why, felt in pain, angry, sad and happy. However, I kept to the promise I made to myself; I look down at my scar and no matter the emotion, I’m spurred on because my scar reminds me that I’m surviving.

I can’t quite believe that time has come already but I am starting back on chemotherapy tomorrow. Do I feel ready to begin cycle 4? The answer is yes. Am I anxious? Yes. Tired? Double yes. I’m worried about how I will find having the chemo treatment and side effects now that I have gone through surgery and am still in recovery mode. But in the words of Franklin Roosevelt, ‘When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hold on.’ So I’m going to tighten my grip and hold on tight, as I start the next phase of recovery.

On 10th September, I took my first proper trip out with my sister. There really was only one thing I wanted to do…get a manicure! I had my nails painted and I opted for a more personalised style than normal to match the #FindingCyril wristbands.

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These bands are a sign of support for the amazing work The Marsden does. They cost £2 each and proceeds go straight to the Royal Marsden. You can donate on the Just Giving Page or by texting FICY58 £2 to 70070. Please get in touch if you would like one.

Finding Cyril has so far raised £5,538.07 for The Royal Marsden which is just beyond amazing! I want to take this opportunity thank everybody who has donated. I find it hard to express in words just how much it means to me. The Marsden are providing life-saving and amazing treatment on a daily basis. Treatment which I’m still receiving and will be for quite some time. I’m determined to raise as much money as I can, and so the support that people have given, and continue to give, means just so very much. So thank you.

So it’s more resting and relaxing for me to prepare for chemo tomorrow. Which means back to my Monday routine of scalp cooling, card games and foot massages…

 

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A guide to scalp cooling and managing hair loss

imageI received my diagnosis on a Thursday and on the Friday I was sitting in front of the professor in charge of my chemotherapy treatment; which was to start on the Monday. There was not much time to get my head around what was happening. I felt relieved that my sister was taking notes during the consultation, because there were moments when I felt like I was present in the room in my body, but not in my mind.

Before the professor came in, we met with his specialist registrar who took us through how the treatment was going to work and what drugs were going to be used. Initially, I was meant to have chemo once every three weeks (3 sessions). When the issue of hair loss came up, I became very distressed. I was told that the hair loss would happen three weeks after my first session and that it would fall out quickly. I think this distress was due to the fact that so many things were changing so quickly.

When the professor eventually came I was imageclutching my sister and was very tearful. He immediately said, “Everybody has given you bad news so far, but I am going to give you some good news.” Instead of having the drug that causes hair loss in one big dose every three weeks, he decided he would administer it weekly so I could try the scalp cooling treatment. Even though he was clear that scalp cooling does not always work, this news instantly took a worry away from me. Although it is hard having chemotherapy each week, this pattern has actually worked well for me. I feel comforted by the fact that I see the doctors each week, and having the chemo drugs administered each week gives me clear milestones to tick off.

imageScalp cooling can reduce the hair loss caused by chemotherapy drugs. These drugs can cause hair loss because they target all the rapidly dividing cells in the body. Cancer cells are rapidly dividing but there are also healthy rapidly dividing cells in our body, like hair follicles.

The scalp cooling treatment works by reducing the amount of chemotherapy drug reaching the hair follicles. Scalp cooling doesn’t work with all chemotherapy drugs and it is not possible to know how effective it will be. In my case the drug Paclitaxel, which makes up 20% of my treatment, is the one that causes hair loss. Scalp cooling doesn’t work with all chemotherapy drugs and it’s not always possible to know how effective the treatment will be.

The cooling cap is placed on my head thirty minutes before the chemo drugs are given. This ensures that the scalp is frozen to the correct temperature. Prior to putting the cap on, the nurses wet my hair, put conditioner in and place my soft headband on, making that it covers my ears. Next, two nurses place the cap on together and push down hard to ensure that there is no gap between the top of the cooling cap and the scalp. Then, they put the chinstrap in place. I find the strap the hardest element of the cap because it is very tight. I don’t seem to find the cap cold-I know this is bizarre! My boyfriend Jonny, who plays American football, looked at me once when I was wearing the cap and told me that he could not cope with his hand in a bag of ice when he dislocated his thumb in football, so he was in awe of how I could deal with a cap that freezes the scalp to -4C. Interestingly, when my cousin came to chemo the cap impressed him. He is known in the family as the one who always gets hot. I recall family holidays with him sleeping with wet flannels (or sometimes even makeshift flannels!) He saw the cap and declared, “I need one of those at home; it would sort out my issues of getting too hot at night!”

Going back to the cooling cap.. As I said, it goes on thirty minutes before the chemo is given and it must stay on one hour after the chemo drug have been administered. It is at this time that I have one of my aunt’s famous foot massages! The massage seems to take my mind of the cooling cap. The paracetamol and lorazepam that the nurses provide also help to deal with the cap. The paracetamol minimizes the chance of a headache and the lorazepam instantly calms you down. I also find that playing games or working on my colouring books helps to take my mind off the cap.
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The nurses are amazing because from the first session they gave lots of advice on how to care for your hair during the treatment. I have been following this carefully in order to have the best chance with the scalp cooling. The fabulous Sandra washes my hair for me on Tuesday mornings and that is the only time I wash my hair. We do it on Tuesday mornings, because after the treatment on a Monday, my hair has lots of conditioner in it. It sounds strange, but having somebody else wash my hair makes me feel better. This is because if hair comes out at this point, I seem to panic less.

We wash my hair using the Paxman shampoo and conditioner. The company that make the cooling caps produces these products, and they were recommended by the nurses. Once my hair is washed, Sandra gently combs my hair with a wooden wide comb, taking care not to apply pressure on the roots. I then wear a soft headband and leave my hair down to dry. The nurses also advised that I do not use straighteners or a hair dryer on my hair as it damages the follicles. After this, I do not comb my hair until the following washing session. I wear soft bands to keep my hair away from my face, or tie it up with a very soft scrunchie. Finally, I sleep in a hair net (this was also recommended by the nurses) The hair net means that my hair is contained during the night, and fewer knots occur. They are actually quite comfortable to sleep in. It is quite an interesting look to be sporting and my sisters have come up with some interesting nicknames! The nurses suggest sometimes cutting a couple of inches off your hair to reduce the weight of it on the roots. Now that my hair has got longer, this is something I will be doing soon.

imageUp to this point the scalp cooling has proved effective for me. I have had normal hair loss but nothing has come out from the roots. I fully expect my hair to thin because the nurses explained that this happens. Today, I commence cycle 3 of my chemo. I will continue with my hair regime to give myself the best possible chance of the cap working. If it continues to work, I will be really relieved and happy. I feel like whilst a lot of things are out of my control, using this cap has given me the chance to take control of, what is in the grand scheme of things, a small thing. In the back of my mind, I know that the effectiveness of the cap might change, but I feel more at ease with this now. This is partly due to a lady I met on the chemo ward. When I went for my second session, the lady sitting next to me was having her first session. My family and myself got chatting with her. She was bright, bubbly and kind. We spoke about the treatment we were both having. She is not having the scalp cooling for her hair, and when she said to me that she was going to embrace any hair loss and “rock the look,”she made a very big impact on me.  I realised that if it happens to me I have the strength to do exactly what she said. I feel like I was meant to sit next to this lady on that particular day because sometimes it is the words of somebody that you do not know that make a mark on you.
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The quote below is taken from the Paxman website and is a description about what scalp cooling offers.

“For patients, this means the opportunity to regain some control, maintain their privacy and encourage a positive attitude towards treatment.”

I firmly believe these words, because if I think back to the meeting with my professor when I was clutching my sister in complete distress at the thought of loosing my hair, the mere fact that I am using the cold cap has instantly given me a more positive attitude towards the treatment.

Using the cold cap can be worrying, but if it is something that can be offered to you, it is worth trying. It can be uncomfortable and some patients will find the cold harder to deal with than others, but the nurses go above and beyond to make you feel comfortable, like making sure you have heated blankets.image

I was anxious the first time the cap went on, and there were moments when I wondered if I would manage with it. However, I think it helped that I had made my mind up that I was going to persevere and think positively about the cooling cap, no matter how it felt. As Theodore Roosevelt once said, “Believe you can and you’re halfway there.”

Further details on Paxman’s scalp cooling and hair care products can be found on http://shop.paxmanscalpcooling.com

 

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#FindingCyril

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